Brown speaks to students about stopping violence
Written by Reuben Frank - csnphilly.com   
October 25, 2011 12:00 AM

 

Some things are more important even than what football team you play for. First he was an Eagle. Then he was a Lion. Now he’s an Eagle again. Whatever NFL jersey he’s wearing, Brown understands the importance of working to end violence in our schools and among our kids.

Brown, who was traded to Detroit last week, only to return to the Eagles when the trade was voided, visited South Philadelphia High School Tuesday and spoke to the students about youth violence and how to stop it.

Brown started “23 Ways to Stop Youth Violence” while he played for the Dolphins, and is now working to end youth violence in inner-city Philadelphia. The “23 Ways to Stop Youth Violence” program operates in conjunction with Brown’s “Ronnie Brown Project,” the Eagles Youth Partnership, Power 99 and City Year of Greater Philadelphia.

“I think, fortunately for us who are on this level, we have an opportunity and a chance to touch peoples’ lives outside of what we do on the football field,” Brown said. “That was something that I started in Miami ... with all of the stuff that was happening in the schools with some shootings and all those things. You never want to see that kind of stuff.

“I felt that instead of just starting a foundation, it was something that I wanted to be a part of where I could actually put some time into it. I was able to visit schools throughout the school year, in the season, and during our off days. I have a chance to do it up here ... and speak to those kids.

“There are alternatives to handling things besides violence. No matter what background you’re from or what kind of struggles you’ve had in your life, you can always overcome them.”

Brown, a Pro Bowl running back with the Dolphins, signed as a free agent with the Eagles in August. His trade to the Lions was voided after Jerome Harrison, who spent part of last year with the Eagles, was found by Eagles team physician Gary Dorshimer to have a brain tumor.

Brown’s chats with youngsters are acompanied by award-winning documentary Teen Truth, a film shot by students that examines teen violence.

“The incidents of violence in our schools are becoming more frequent and more brutal, and it has just gotten to the point where enough is enough,” Brown said. “We are very proud of how this program was received in Miami and we are extremely excited to bring this initiative to Philadelphia.  I hope we can be a part of a positive change in how these kids interact with each other.”

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